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Buddha of Hyderabad

History of Hyderabad

Hyderabad is an historic city noted for its many monuments, temples, churches, masjids, and bazaars. A multitude of influences has shaped the character of the city in the last 400 years. The city is forming its role and outlook as part of the booming service industry revolution, and is trying to preserve and popularize its history.

 Hyderabad History

The area around Hyderabad was ruled by the Mauryan Empire in the third century B. C during the reign of Ashoka the Great. After the death of Ashoka (232 BCE), as the Maurya Empire began to weaken and decline, the Satavahanas who started out as feudatories to the Mauryan dynasty, declared independence and established their empire in this region. The Satavahana Empire or Andhra Empire, was a royal Indian dynasty based from Dharanikota and Amaravati in Andhra Pradesh as well as Junnar (Pune) and Prathisthan (Paithan) in Maharashtra.

The territory of the empire covered much of the Deccan plateau & central India for 450 years, i. e. , from 230 BCE onward until around 220 CE. After the decline of the Satavahana Empire in 220 AD, the region came under the rule of the Andhra Ikshvaku dynasty (225 AD - 325 AD), the successors of the Satavahanas in the eastern Deccan. The capital of Andhra Ikshvaku dynasty was the town of Nagarjunakonda in modern day Nalgonda district and named after Nagarjuna, a southern Indian master of Mahayana Buddhism who lived in the 2nd century AD, who is believed to have been responsible for the Buddhist activity in the area.

Various Buddhist and Hindu kingdoms ruled the area during the subsequent centuries. The area was ruled by the Kalyani branch of the Chalukya kings. When the Chalukya kingdom became weaker, Kakatiyas, who were feudal chieftains of Chalukya, declared independence and setup their kingdom around Warangal.

The fall of Warangal to Muhammad bin Tughluq's forces from the Delhi Sultanate in 1321 AD brought anarchy to the region. For the next few decades, the Bahmani Sultanate of the Deccan fought the Musunuri Nayakas on the north and the Vijayanagara Rayas on the south for control of the region. By the middle of the 15th century, the region was under the firm control of the Bahmani Sultanate which controlled the Deccan north of the Krishna River from coast to coast.